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  1. #1
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    Why don't we see this in the news?

    What an accolade for a life well lived!!!! (I mean HER)
    Audie Murphy's Wife.
    List of Decorations for Audie Murphy.
    Medal of Honor
    Distinguished Service Cross
    Silver Star (with oak leaf cluster)
    Legion of Merit
    Bronze Star (with oak leaf cluster and Valor device)
    Purple Heart (with two oak leaf clusters)
    U.S. Army Outstanding Civilian Service Medal
    U.S. Army Good Conduct Medal
    Presidential Unit Citation (with First Oak Leaf Cluster)
    American Campaign Medal
    European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal (with One Silver Star, Four Bronze Service Stars (representing nine campaigns) and one Bronze Arrowhead (representing assault landing at Sicily and Southern France)),
    World War II Victory Medal
    Army of Occupation Medal (with Germany Clasp)
    Armed Forces Reserve Medal
    French Fourragère in Colors of the Croix de guerre
    French Legion of Honor - Grade of Chevalier
    French Croix de guerre (with Silver Star),
    French Croix de guerre (with Palm)
    Medal of Liberated France
    Belgian Croix de guerre (with 1940 Palm)

    Additionally, Murphy was awarded:
    the Combat Infantry Badge,
    Marksman Badge with Rifle Bar,
    Expert Badge with Bayonet Bar



    Isn't it sad that the media can tell us all about the crap that goes on but ignores the GOOD people. If a movie star or politician stubs their toe we have to hear about it for days!!!

    A Great Lady Has Passed

    Pamela Murphy, widow of WWII hero and actor, Audie Murphy, died peacefully at her home on April 8, 2010. She was the widow of the most decorated WWII hero and actor, Audie Murphy, and established her own distinctive 35 year career working as a patient liaison at the Sepulveda Veterans Administration hospital, treatingevery veteran who visited the facility as if they were a VIP.
    Any soldier or Marine who came into the hospital got the same special treatment from her. She would walk the hallways with her clipboard in hand making sure her boys got to see the specialist they needed.

    If they didn't, watch out. Her boys weren't Medal of Honor recipients or movie stars like Audie, but that didn't matter to Pam. They had served their country. That was good enough for her. She never called a veteran by his first name. It was always "Mister." Respect came with the job.

    "Nobody could cut through VA red tape faster than Mrs. Murphy," said veteran Stephen Sherman, speaking for thousands of veterans she befriended over the years. "Many times I watched her march a veteran who had been waiting more than an hour right into the doctor's office. She was even reprimanded a few times, but it didn't matter to Mrs. Murphy. "Only her boys mattered. She was our angel."

    Audie Murphy died broke in a plane crash in 1971, squandering millions of dollars on gambling, bad investments, and yes, other women. "Even with the adultery and desertion at the end, he always remained my hero," Pam told me.

    She went from a comfortable ranch-style home in Van Nuys where she raised two sons to a small apartment - taking a clerk's job at the nearby VA to support herself and start paying off her faded movie star husband's debts. At first, no one knew who she was. Soon, though, word spread throughthe VA that the nice woman with the clipboard was Audie Murphy's widow. It was like saying General Patton had just walked in the front door. Men with tears in their eyes walked up to her and gave her a hug.

    "Thank you," they said, over and over.

    The first couple of years, I think the hugs were more for Audie's memory as a war hero. The last 30 years, they were for Pam.

    One year I asked her to be the focus of a Veteran's Day column for all the work she had done. Pam just shook her head no. "Honor them, not me," she said, pointing to a group of veterans down the hallway. "They're the ones who deserve it."

    The vets disagreed. Mrs. Murphy deserved the accolades, they said. Incredibly, in 2002, Pam's job was going to be eliminated in budget cuts. She was considered "excess staff." "I don't think helping cut down on veterans' complaints and showing them the respect they deserve, should be considered excess staff," she told me. Neither did the veterans. They went ballistic, holding a rally for her outside the VA gates. Pretty soon, word came down from the top of the VA. Pam Murphy was no longer considered "excess staff." She remained working full time at the VA until 2007 when she was 87.

    "The last time she was here was a couple of years ago for the conference we had for homeless veterans," said Becky James, coordinator of the VA's Veterans History Project. Pam wanted to see if there was anything she could do to help some more of her boys. Pam Murphy was 90 when she died last week. What a lady.
    Dennis McCarthy, Los Angeles Times on April 15, 2010 ~

    Now folks why can't we see stuff like this on the news? Why can't the news tell stories of hope and inspiration, I'm sick and tired hearing about Haiti this and Haiti that. In America, lets take care of our own and get stories like this one above that my dad emailed me on FOXNews, CNN, MSNBC and the such, but do they.... NO, they care more about celebrities and how many times they screw up





    FIRST TO ARRIVE TRAINED TO SURVIVE. This is the motto for all USN Damage Controlman

  2. #2
    Tim's Bromance Partner
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    Re: Why don't we see this in the news?

    Audie Murphy was the man, and a guy that every NCO in my unit looked up to and learned about as we made CPL then SGT.
    "Necessity is the plea of every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants, it is the creed of slaves"

    William Pitt, 1783



  3. #3
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    Re: Why don't we see this in the news?

    Great story. But sadly the media only reports stories they can make a dollar on.
    So this lady hero gets ignored. And we get news about mindset loan eating sushi with her ex girl friend.

    Damn sad really.

    Sent from HTC EVO using tapatalk.

  4. #4
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    Re: Why don't we see this in the news?

    Great write up...Thanks for sharing Trained!!! Audie was definitely a great Man/Solider. I actually knew about him before my time in the Army. My Grand father was a WWll Vet with the 69th ID and every time one of us kids or anyone that was around him would say "I can't", "Why", or any other Negatives along them lines. He would quickly reply " Maj. Audie Murphy wouldn't say that" My Cousin and I heard it from him VERY often because we where the 2 that where around him the most. We asked him one day about Maj. Murphy and Gramp was happy to fill us in about him. Isn't it strange that My Cousin and I are now both Vets of an Infantry Unit??? My Cousin was with 6th ID form Fort Richardson, Alaska.

    Ok, now for Mrs. Murphy.... She was a Solider on her own...She worked untill she was 87. :shock: I hope I live to be that old.. Every VA need a Mrs. Murphy IMO.

  5. #5
    Silent but Deadly....
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    Re: Why don't we see this in the news?

    I agree Audie Murphy was/is a true american hero.. Great write up. His wife set the bar high for every veteran and she instilled values for the VA that stand tall today.

    On a side note:
    Quote Originally Posted by A-25TH-ID-VET
    sn't it strange that My Cousin and I are now both Vets of an Infantry Unit??? My Cousin was with 6th ID form Fort Richardson, Alaska.
    :shock: :shock: I dated a Xray tech from Fort Richardson. I visited that place frequently lol.. maybe i met your brother
    http://forums.usmilitarygamers.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=3616&d=1341691069

    Silent But Deadly!

  6. #6
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    Re: Why don't we see this in the news?

    Quote Originally Posted by XxSILENTxFARTxX
    I agree Audie Murphy was/is a true american hero.. Great write up. His wife set the bar high for every veteran and she instilled values for the VA that stand tall today.

    On a side note:
    Quote Originally Posted by A-25TH-ID-VET
    isn't it strange that My Cousin and I are now both Vets of an Infantry Unit??? My Cousin was with 6th ID form Fort Richardson, Alaska.
    :shock: :shock: I dated a Xray tech from Fort Richardson. I visited that place frequently lol.. maybe i met your brother
    I doubt that Silent...unless you there form 90-94 She had to be in the Military cause the ladies are few and far between there.

  7. #7
    Silent but Deadly....
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    Re: Why don't we see this in the news?

    Ya she was in the army but this was like 2003 lol
    http://forums.usmilitarygamers.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=3616&d=1341691069

    Silent But Deadly!

  8. #8
    USMG [Retired Staff] Member
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    Re: Why don't we see this in the news?

    most highest of speed EVER


  9. #9
    USMG [Retired Staff] Member
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    Re: Why don't we see this in the news?

    Robert L. Howard, one of America's most decorated soldiers. He served five tours in Vietnam and is the only soldier in our nation's history to be nominated for the Congressional Medal of Honor three times for three separate actions within a thirteen month period. The first nomination was downgraded to the Distinguished Service Cross. The second nomination was downgraded to the Silver Star. The third nomination was downgraded to a 2nd Distinguished Service Cross but later upgraded to the Medal of Honor.

    He received a direct appointment from Master Sergeant to 1st Lieutenant in 1969, and was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Richard M. Nixon at the White House in 1971. His other awards for valor include the Distinguished Service Cross - our nation's second highest award, the Silver Star - the third highest award, and numerous lesser decorations including eight Purple Hearts. He received his decorations for valor for actions while serving as an NCO (Non-Commissioned Officer).

    Robert L. Howard grew up in Opelika, Alabama and enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1956 at age seventeen. He retired as a full Colonel in 1992 after 36 years service. During Vietnam, he served in the U.S. Army Special Forces (Green Berets) and spent most of his five tours in the super-secret MACV-SOG (Military Assistance Command Vietnam Studies and Observations Group) also known as Special Operations Group, which ran classified cross-border operations into Laos, Cambodia, and North Vietnam. These men carried out some of the most daring and dangerous missions ever conducted by the U.S. military. The understrength sixty-man recon company at Kontum in which he served was the Vietnam War's most highly decorated unit of its size with five Medals of Honor. It was for his actions while serving on a mission to rescue a fellow soldier in Cambodia, that he was submitted for the Medal of Honor the third time for his extraordinary heroism.

    Robert L. Howard is said to be our nation's most decorated soldier from the Vietnam War. He was the last Vietnam Special Forces Medal of Honor recipient still on active duty when he retired on Sept. 29, 1992.

    --http://rlhtribute.com/
    A List of his awards:
    Medal of Honor
    Distinguished Service Cross (with one oak leaf cluster) (2 awards)
    Silver Star
    Legion of Merit (with three oak leaf clusters) (4 awards)
    Bronze Star (with three oak leaf clusters and "V" device) (4 awards)
    Purple Heart (with a silver and two bronze oak leaf clusters) (8 awards)
    Meritorious Service Medal (with two oak leaf clusters) (3 awards)
    Air Medal (with "V" Device and numeral 3. One award for heroism and two for aerial achievement)
    Joint Service Commendation
    Army Commendation Medal (with "V" device and one each silver and bronze oak leaf clusters. 4 awards for valor and 3 for achievement)
    Joint Service Achievement
    Army Achievement
    Good Conduct Medal with four Good Conduct Loops (4 awards)
    National Defense Service Medal
    Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal with three service stars (3 awards)
    Vietnam Service Medal with 3 service stars (3 campaigns)
    Armed Forces Reserve Medal
    NCO Professional Development Ribbon with 2 device
    Army Service Ribbon
    Army Overseas Service Ribbon

    Unit Awards
    Presidential Unit Citation (Army) with oak leaf cluster (2 awards)
    Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army)
    Navy Unit Commendation
    Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry Unit Citation with Palm (Unit citation)
    Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Unit Citation with Palm (Unit citation)

    Foreign decorations
    Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with Gold Star (Corps citation), Silver Star (Division citation) and Bronze Star (Regiment/Brigade citation)
    Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces Honor Medal, 1st Class
    Republic of Vietnam Civil Actions Medal, 1st Class
    Republic of Vietnam Wound Medal
    Republic of Vietnam Staff Service Medal, 2nd Class
    Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal with 1960 bar
    Republic of Korea Order of National Security Merit (Sam-Il Medal)

    Badges, qualifications and tabs
    Ranger Tab
    Special Forces Tab
    Combat Infantryman Badge
    Expert Infantryman's Badge
    Aircrew Badge
    Master Parachutist Badge
    Pathfinder Badge
    Air Assault Badge
    Expert Marksmanship Badge
    Vietnamese Ranger Badge
    Vietnamese Master Parachute Badge
    Thai Master Parachute Wings
    Korean Master Parachute Badge
    Thai Balloonist Badge
    French Parachutist Badge

    --Audie Murphy was great and all.. but i'm a Howard fan.
    "Kill one man, and you are a murderer. Kill millions of men, and you are a conqueror. Kill them all, and you are a god."

  10. #10
    USMG [Retired Staff] Member
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    Re: Why don't we see this in the news?

    Quote Originally Posted by Amiable Horde
    Robert L. Howard, one of America's most decorated soldiers. He served five tours in Vietnam and is the only soldier in our nation's history to be nominated for the Congressional Medal of Honor three times for three separate actions within a thirteen month period. The first nomination was downgraded to the Distinguished Service Cross. The second nomination was downgraded to the Silver Star. The third nomination was downgraded to a 2nd Distinguished Service Cross but later upgraded to the Medal of Honor.

    He received a direct appointment from Master Sergeant to 1st Lieutenant in 1969, and was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Richard M. Nixon at the White House in 1971. His other awards for valor include the Distinguished Service Cross - our nation's second highest award, the Silver Star - the third highest award, and numerous lesser decorations including eight Purple Hearts. He received his decorations for valor for actions while serving as an NCO (Non-Commissioned Officer).

    Robert L. Howard grew up in Opelika, Alabama and enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1956 at age seventeen. He retired as a full Colonel in 1992 after 36 years service. During Vietnam, he served in the U.S. Army Special Forces (Green Berets) and spent most of his five tours in the super-secret MACV-SOG (Military Assistance Command Vietnam Studies and Observations Group) also known as Special Operations Group, which ran classified cross-border operations into Laos, Cambodia, and North Vietnam. These men carried out some of the most daring and dangerous missions ever conducted by the U.S. military. The understrength sixty-man recon company at Kontum in which he served was the Vietnam War's most highly decorated unit of its size with five Medals of Honor. It was for his actions while serving on a mission to rescue a fellow soldier in Cambodia, that he was submitted for the Medal of Honor the third time for his extraordinary heroism.

    Robert L. Howard is said to be our nation's most decorated soldier from the Vietnam War. He was the last Vietnam Special Forces Medal of Honor recipient still on active duty when he retired on Sept. 29, 1992.

    --http://rlhtribute.com/
    A List of his awards:
    Medal of Honor
    Distinguished Service Cross (with one oak leaf cluster) (2 awards)
    Silver Star
    Legion of Merit (with three oak leaf clusters) (4 awards)
    Bronze Star (with three oak leaf clusters and "V" device) (4 awards)
    Purple Heart (with a silver and two bronze oak leaf clusters) (8 awards)
    Meritorious Service Medal (with two oak leaf clusters) (3 awards)
    Air Medal (with "V" Device and numeral 3. One award for heroism and two for aerial achievement)
    Joint Service Commendation
    Army Commendation Medal (with "V" device and one each silver and bronze oak leaf clusters. 4 awards for valor and 3 for achievement)
    Joint Service Achievement
    Army Achievement
    Good Conduct Medal with four Good Conduct Loops (4 awards)
    National Defense Service Medal
    Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal with three service stars (3 awards)
    Vietnam Service Medal with 3 service stars (3 campaigns)
    Armed Forces Reserve Medal
    NCO Professional Development Ribbon with 2 device
    Army Service Ribbon
    Army Overseas Service Ribbon

    Unit Awards
    Presidential Unit Citation (Army) with oak leaf cluster (2 awards)
    Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army)
    Navy Unit Commendation
    Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry Unit Citation with Palm (Unit citation)
    Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Unit Citation with Palm (Unit citation)

    Foreign decorations
    Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with Gold Star (Corps citation), Silver Star (Division citation) and Bronze Star (Regiment/Brigade citation)
    Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces Honor Medal, 1st Class
    Republic of Vietnam Civil Actions Medal, 1st Class
    Republic of Vietnam Wound Medal
    Republic of Vietnam Staff Service Medal, 2nd Class
    Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal with 1960 bar
    Republic of Korea Order of National Security Merit (Sam-Il Medal)

    Badges, qualifications and tabs
    Ranger Tab
    Special Forces Tab
    Combat Infantryman Badge
    Expert Infantryman's Badge
    Aircrew Badge
    Master Parachutist Badge
    Pathfinder Badge
    Air Assault Badge
    Expert Marksmanship Badge
    Vietnamese Ranger Badge
    Vietnamese Master Parachute Badge
    Thai Master Parachute Wings
    Korean Master Parachute Badge
    Thai Balloonist Badge
    French Parachutist Badge

    --Audie Murphy was great and all.. but i'm a Howard fan.

    I can only imagine how heavy is uniform was with all those medals, but the article had very little to due to Audie Murphy, it was his wife who fought for the veterans





    FIRST TO ARRIVE TRAINED TO SURVIVE. This is the motto for all USN Damage Controlman

  11. #11
    USMG [Retired Staff] Member
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    Re: Why don't we see this in the news?

    Quote Originally Posted by Trained2Survive

    I can only imagine how heavy is uniform was with all those medals, but the article had very little to due to Audie Murphy, it was his wife who fought for the veterans
    yeah i know, but the spin offs were starting to talk about murphy and i was wondering if anyone had read on howard.
    "Kill one man, and you are a murderer. Kill millions of men, and you are a conqueror. Kill them all, and you are a god."

  12. #12
    USMG [Retired Staff] Member
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    Re: Why don't we see this in the news?

    heres another one of my favorite stroies that should have been featured in the news, but no all we continue hearing about is how many celebs screw up


    but here goes....

    From a Viet Nam veterans' wife Richard, (my husband), never really talked a lot about his time in Viet Nam other than he had been shot by a sniper. However, he had a rather grainy, 8 x 10 black & white photo he had taken at a USO show of Ann Margaret with Bob Hope in the background that was one of his treasures.
    A few years ago, Ann Margaret was doing a book signing at a local bookstore. Richard wanted to see if he could get her to sign the treasured photo so he arrived at the bookstore at 12 o'clock for the 7:30 signing. When I got there after work, the line went all the way around the bookstore, circled the parking lot, and disappeared behind a parking garage.

    Before her appearance, bookstore employees announced that she would sign only her book and no memorabilia would be permitted. Richard was disappointed, but wanted to show her the photo and let her know how much those shows meant to lonely GI's so far from home.

    Ann Margaret came out looking as beautiful as ever and, as 2nd in line, it was soon Richard's turn. He presented the book for her signature and then took out the photo. When he did, there were many shouts from the employees that she would not sign it. Richard said, "I understand. I just wanted her to see it".

    She took one look at the photo, tears welled up in her eyes and she said, "This is one of my gentlemen from Viet Nam and I most certainly will sign his photo. I know what these men did for their country and I always have time for "my gentlemen". With that, she pulled Richard across the table and planted a big kiss on him. She then made quite a to do about the bravery of the young men she met over the years, how much she admired them, and how much she appreciated them. There weren't too many dry eyes among those close enough to hear. She then posed for pictures and acted as if he was the only one there.

    Later at dinner, Richard was very quiet. When I asked if he'd like to talk about it, my big strong husband broke down in tears. "That's the first time anyone ever thanked me for my time in the Army", he said.

    Richard, like many others, came home to people who spit on him and shouted ugly things at him. That night was a turning point for him. He walked a little straighter and, for the first time in years, was proud to have been a Vet. I'll never forget Ann Margaret for her graciousness and how much that small act of kindness meant to my husband. I now make it a point to say Thank You to every person I come across who served in our Armed Forces. Freedom does not come cheap and I am grateful for all those who have served their country.

    If you'd like to pass on this story, feel free to do so. Perhaps it will help others to become aware of how important it is to acknowledge the contribution our service people make.

    this was in an email I received from my dad





    FIRST TO ARRIVE TRAINED TO SURVIVE. This is the motto for all USN Damage Controlman

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